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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 106

Improving participants' retention in a smoking cessation intervention using a community-based participatory research approach


1 Master of Social Work Program, School of Social Work, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD, USA
2 Department of Public Health Analysis, School of Community Health and Policy; Prevention Sciences Research Center, School of Community Health and Policy, Baltimore, MD, USA
3 ASCEND Center for Biomedical Research; Department of Biology, School of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD, USA
4 CEASE Partnership, Fusion Incorporated, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD, USA
5 Department of Health Policy and Managment, School of Community Health and Policy, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD, USA
6 School of Social Work, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA
7 Prevention Sciences Research Center, School of Community Health and Policy; ASCEND Center for Biomedical Research; Department of Behavioral Health Sciences, School of Community Health and Policy, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD, USA

Correspondence Address:
Payam Sheikhattari
School of Community Health and Policy, Morgan State University, 1700 E. Cold Spring Lane, Portage Campus #103, Baltimore, MD
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijpvm.IJPVM_303_17

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Background: This study compares participants' retention in three phases of smoking cessation interventions, one provided in a health clinic and the subsequent two in community-based settings. Methods: Smoking cessation interventions were conducted in three phases from 2008 to 2015 in two underserved urban communities with low socioeconomic profiles and high rates of smoking (n = 951). Phase I was conducted in a clinic; Phases II and III were conducted in community venues. In Phases II and III, incremental changes were made based on lessons learned from the previous phases. Retention (attending six or more sessions) was the primary predictor of cessation and was analyzed while controlling for associated factors including age, gender, race, employment, education, and nicotine dependence. Results: Retention increased substantially over the three phases, with rates for attending six or more sessions of 13.8%, 51.9%, and 67.9% in Phases I, II, and III, respectively. Retention was significantly higher in community settings than in the clinic setting (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 6.7; 95% confidence intervals [CI] = 4.6, 9.8). In addition to the intervention in community venues, predictors of retention included age and unemployment. Higher retention was significantly associated with higher quit rates (adjusted OR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.5, 3.8). Conclusions: Conducting the intervention in community settings using trained peer motivators rather than health-care providers resulted in significantly higher retention and smoking cessation rates. This was due in part to the ability to tailor cessation classes in the community for specific populations and improving the quality of the intervention based on feedback from participants and community partners.


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