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 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 165

Exercise as preventative therapy against neurodegenerative diseases in older adults


Physical Activity and Health Promotion, Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier, 1, 00133 Roma RM, Italy

Date of Submission08-Aug-2019
Date of Acceptance13-Aug-2019
Date of Web Publication09-Oct-2019

Correspondence Address:
Chidiebere Emmanuel Okechukwu
Physical Activity and Health Promotion, Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier, 1, 00133 Roma RM
Italy
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijpvm.IJPVM_296_19

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How to cite this article:
Okechukwu CE. Exercise as preventative therapy against neurodegenerative diseases in older adults. Int J Prev Med 2019;10:165

How to cite this URL:
Okechukwu CE. Exercise as preventative therapy against neurodegenerative diseases in older adults. Int J Prev Med [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Dec 13];10:165. Available from: http://www.ijpvmjournal.net/text.asp?2019/10/1/165/268741



Dear Editor,

Exercise could be effective as preventative remedy against neurodegenerative diseases in older adults.[1] Exercise is neuroprotective because it has been shown to improve skills, reduce motor discrepancies, upsurge new neuron development, amend neurological damages, obstruct age-related neuronal harm, and prevent cognitive decline among older adults.[2] Physically active aged rats in comparison to inactive aged rats show enhanced three-dimensional learning, improved memory retention, and reduced age-related deteriorations in spontaneous activity.[3] Humans produce fewer insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) during normal aging process; IGF-1 plays a key role in the growth of cellular structures in a matured brain; however, exercise was found to increase the uptake of neurotropic IGF-1 from circulation directly to precise areas such as the hippocampus.[4] Regarding the aging brain, there is deterioration in the antioxidant protective mechanisms, which increases the susceptibility of the brain to harmful effects of oxidative stress. Moderate intensity physical exercise increases antioxidant levels in older adults, thereby improving brain function and reducing oxidative stress.[5] Since exercise can counteract neurodegeneration, depending on the type, intensity, and duration, it could be an effective preventive tool for older adults genetically susceptible to neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer's and associated memory loss [Figure 1].
Figure 1: Possible role of exercise in neuroprotection

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Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Van Uffelen JG, Chin A Paw MJ, Hopman-Rock M, Van Mechelen W. The effects of exercise on cognition in older adults with and without cognitive decline: A systematic review. Clin J Sport Med 2008;18:486-500.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Weuve J, Kang JH, Manson JAE, Breteler MMB, Ware JH, Grodstein F. Physical activity, including walking, and cognitive function in older women. JAMA 2004;292:1454-61.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Wang S, Chen L, Zhang I, Huang C, Xiu Y, Wang F, et al. Effects of long-term exercise on spatial learning, memory ability, and cortical capillaries in aged rats. Med Sci Monit 2015;21:945-54.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Scarmeas N, Luchsinger JA, Schupf N, Brickman AM, Cosentino S, Tang MX, et al. Physical activity, diet, and risk of Alzheimer disease. JAMA 2009;302:627-37.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Gebel K, Ding D, Chey T, Stamatakis E, Brown WJ, Bauman AE. Effect of moderate to vigorous physical activity on all-cause mortality in middle-aged and older Australians. JAMA Intern Med 2015;175:970-7.  Back to cited text no. 5
    


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