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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 17

Effect of Vitamin D supplement on mood status and inflammation in Vitamin D deficient Type 2 diabetic women with anxiety: A randomized clinical trial


1 Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2 Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
3 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Health, Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord, Iran
4 Internal Center, Imam Ali Hospital of Farokhshahr, Social Security Organization, Shahrekord, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Reza Amani
Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijpvm.IJPVM_174_18

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Background: Vitamin D plays an important role in nervous health and depression. Vitamin D deficiency and anxiety affect diabetic status. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of vitamin D supplementation on anxiety, depression, and inflammation in diabetic women with anxiety. Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, totally 51 women with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and vitamin D deficiency were randomly allocated to receive one oral pearl of 50,000 IU vitamin D3 (26 women) or a placebo (25 women) fortnightly for 16 weeks. Anthropometric indices, sun exposure, dietary intake, depression, anxiety, and stress scores and biochemical biomarkers including high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were measured at the baseline and after 16-week supplementation. Results: Mean ± SD age of participant was 47.43 ± 9.57 years old. Baseline values were not different between the groups. Anxiety score changes were significantly lower in vitamin D group than the controls (P = 0.001). Within group comparison indicated that depression in supplement group with lower vitamin D levels was significantly reduced. Serum hs-CRP reduced (P = 0.01), while IL-10 concentrations increased (P = 0.04) in the intervention group. Conclusions: Vitamin D supplementation can improve mood status and anti-inflammatory biomarkers in female diabetics with anxiety and vitamin D deficiency.


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