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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 102

Protective effect of Vitis vinifera (black grape) seed extract and oil on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats


1 School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2 Department of Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
3 Department of Clinical Pathology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
4 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Mohsen Minaiyan
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijpvm.IJPVM_362_19

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Background: Vitis vinifera (black grape) is cultivated worldwide and has numerous oral and therapeutic applications. It has proven anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and wound healing properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of black grape seed (hydroalcoholic) extract (BGSE) and black grape seed oil (BGSO) on experimental colitis. Methods: BGSE (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) and BGSO (2, 4, and 8 mL/kg) were administered orally (p.o.) in groups of six male Wistar rats, 2 h before induction of colitis and continued further for 4 days. Prednisolone (4 mg/kg) and mesalamine (100 mg/kg) were used as reference drugs. Weight/length of colons, macroscopic and histopathologic indices, and biochemical parameters including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were evaluated. Results: All doses of BGSE and BGSO significantly decreased the colon weight, ulcer index, and total colitis index in comparison with the control group, although greater doses of both fractions had more significant protection. Data of MPO activity revealed that all treated groups with the exception of BGSE (50 mg/kg) and BGSO (2 mL/kg) showed a meaningful decline in comparison with the control group. Concerning the MDA values in colonic tissue, it was demonstrated that BGSE (100, 200 mg/kg) and BGSO (8 mL/kg) caused a significant dip in this oxidative stress parameter. Conclusions: Oral administration of BGSE and BGSO had an appropriate anti-inflammatory effect and so could be considered as a suitable candidate for treating or preventing ulcerative colitis. Furthermore, detailed studies are warranted to explore the exact mechanism of action and clinical preference of these compounds.


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