• Users Online: 356
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Browse Articles Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 40

Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of hydroalcoholic and hexane extracts of Smyrniopsis aucheri in animal models


1 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Isfahan Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2 Department of Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Valiollah Hajhashemi
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Isfahan Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan
Iran
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijpvm.IJPVM_550_20

Rights and Permissions

Background: The fruits of Apiaceae family have been widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of pain and inflammation. In this study, we evaluated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of wild celery (Smyrniopsis aucheri) seeds, as a member of the Apiaceae family. Methods: Hydroalcoholic and hexane extracts of seeds were prepared and for the evaluation of analgesic activity, acetic acid, formalin, and hotplate tests in male mice (20–30 g) and for anti-inflammatory assessment carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats and croton oil-induced ear edema in mice were used. Results: Hydroalcoholic and hexane extracts (100–400 mg/kg) significantly reduced abdominal spasms in the acetic acid test. In the formalin test, the hydroalcoholic extract at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg reduced the pain of the chronic phase while hexane extract was effective in both acute and chronic phases. In the hot plate test, both extracts were ineffective. In the carrageenan and croton tests, both extracts at a dose of 400 mg/kg significantly reduced edema. Conclusions: The results revealed the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of plant seed extracts. Due to the lack of response of the extracts in the hot plate test, it seems that the plant mainly has a peripheral analgesic effect.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed97    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded16    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal