International Journal of Preventive Medicine

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 197-

Intelligence quotient, anxiety, and depression in congenital hypothyroid children at school age


Mitra Nekouei1, Alireza Firoozfar1, Dorna Kheirabadi1, Sadegh Baradaran Mahdavi1, Ali Talebi1, Manizheh Danesh1, Maryam Yahay1, Mahdokht Rahimi1, Laya Golshani1, Gholam Reza Kheirabadi2, Mahin Hashemipour1 
1 Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2 Behavioral Sciences Research Centre, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Gholam Reza Kheirabadi
Behavioral Sciences Research Center, Khorshid Hospital, Ostandari St., Isfahan
Iran

Background: Many studies who evaluated the outcome of the congenital hypothyroidism (CH) screening reported some intellectual and behavioral deficit despite early diagnose and treatment. The aim of the present study was to compare the intellectual and behavioral adjustment of CH children with controls. Methods: This study was conducted among a group of 135 children aged 8--12 years in Isfahan, including transient and permanent congenital hypothyroidism (TCH and PCH) and a matched group of their classmate. Demographic characteristics collected using a designed data collecting form completed by parents. Intellectual quotient (IQ) was evaluated using Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children aged 6--16 years (WISC-III). Depression and anxiety were evaluated using The Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC), respectively. The SPSS software version 20.0 was used for data analysis. Nonparametric tests (Mann--Whitney) were used to investigate the association between variables. A significant level of less than 0.05 was considered in all analyzes. Results: There was no significant difference in the IQ scores between PCH and TCH groups (P = NS). However, neither of them had intellectual disability (defined as IQ <70). IQ scores were significantly lower in PCH comparing to controls (P < 0.001). Total IQ and verbal IQ were significantly differenct between TCH and control group (P = 0.007 and P = 0.001). No significant difference was found in anxiety and depression scores between CH children and controls. Conclusions: There is no significant difference in anxiety and depression scores between congenital hypothyroidism children and controls, although IQ scores in children with congenital hypothyroidism is lower than controls.


How to cite this article:
Nekouei M, Firoozfar A, Kheirabadi D, Mahdavi SB, Talebi A, Danesh M, Yahay M, Rahimi M, Golshani L, Kheirabadi GR, Hashemipour M. Intelligence quotient, anxiety, and depression in congenital hypothyroid children at school age.Int J Prev Med 2020;11:197-197


How to cite this URL:
Nekouei M, Firoozfar A, Kheirabadi D, Mahdavi SB, Talebi A, Danesh M, Yahay M, Rahimi M, Golshani L, Kheirabadi GR, Hashemipour M. Intelligence quotient, anxiety, and depression in congenital hypothyroid children at school age. Int J Prev Med [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Jan 17 ];11:197-197
Available from: https://www.ijpvmjournal.net/article.asp?issn=2008-7802;year=2020;volume=11;issue=1;spage=197;epage=197;aulast=Nekouei;type=0