International Journal of Preventive Medicine

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2021  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 10-

Mini-Trampoline Jumping as an Exercise Intervention in Postmenopausal Women to Improve Women Specific Health Risk Factors


Anja Fricke1, Philip W Fink2, Toby Mundel2, Sally D Lark1, Sarah P Shultz3 
1 School of Sport Exercise and Nutrition, Massey University, Wallace Street, Wellington, New Zealand
2 School of Sport Exercise and Nutrition, Massey University, Massey University Ave and Albany Drive Palmerston-North, New Zealand
3 School of Sport Exercise and Nutrition, Massey University, Wallace Street, Wellington, New Zealand; Kinesiology Department, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, Seattle, WA, USA

Correspondence Address:
Anja Fricke
School of Sport Exercise and Nutrition, Massey University, Wallace Street, Wellington
New Zealand

Background: Women tend to outlive men and are at higher risks of functional disability compared to men. Specifically, women are more likely to develop conditions like osteoporosis and stress urinary incontinence which can further increase the risk of functional disability. Regular physical activity and/or exercise programs can minimize the physiological decline that occurs during aging and can improve overall physical fitness, bone health, and pelvic floor muscle function; however, exercise programs tend to focus on only one parameter. Mini-trampoline jumping is a highly beneficial low-impact aerobic exercise capable of improving aerobic fitness, balance, muscle strength, and potentially bone health as well as pelvic floor muscle functioning. The aim of the proposed research project is to examine the benefits of a 3-month mini-trampoline exercise intervention on physical fitness, bone health, and pelvic floor muscle functioning in postmenopausal women. Methods: Fifty postmenopausal healthy women aged 50–69 years will be recruited. Assessments on physical fitness (aerobic fitness, walking speed, balance, lower extremity strength, flexibility), bone health, and pelvic floor muscle functioning will occur within 1 week before and after the exercise intervention, including a 3-month follow-up assessment. The exercise intervention will last 12 weeks, with three sessions of 40 min each per week. Conclusions: The proposed research has the potential to improve functional ability and women-specific risk factors in older women with an innovative and fun exercise program.


How to cite this article:
Fricke A, Fink PW, Mundel T, Lark SD, Shultz SP. Mini-Trampoline Jumping as an Exercise Intervention in Postmenopausal Women to Improve Women Specific Health Risk Factors.Int J Prev Med 2021;12:10-10


How to cite this URL:
Fricke A, Fink PW, Mundel T, Lark SD, Shultz SP. Mini-Trampoline Jumping as an Exercise Intervention in Postmenopausal Women to Improve Women Specific Health Risk Factors. Int J Prev Med [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Feb 26 ];12:10-10
Available from: https://www.ijpvmjournal.net/article.asp?issn=2008-7802;year=2021;volume=12;issue=1;spage=10;epage=10;aulast=Fricke;type=0